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FULL REPORT: Resident had COVID-19 before, test shows

UPDATE 5:48 p.m.:

IgG/IgM rapid tests detect the presence of antibodies a patient's body generated in response to past or present COVID-19 infection, Dr.  Charles Patrick Davis explained in an article on MedicineNet.com.

UPDATE 5:38 p.m.:

A Cooke County resident is believed to have had COVID-19 over a month ago but hasn’t shown symptoms since the first part of March, the Cooke County COVID-19 Joint Information Center announced late Thursday afternoon, April 9.

The resident was tested using a type of test that can flag previous infections even if the patient isn’t currently infected or contagious, according to a JIC press release. It’s one of two types of tests used in Cooke County, but because it can return a positive result when someone isn’t “actively infected,” according to the release, results from that type of test aren’t counted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The patient was tested this week, JIC spokeswoman Kristi Rigsby said. It’s the only positive result from that type of test that county officials are aware of, according to the release.

Rigsby said the patient was sick with flu-like symptoms in February but symptoms had cleared up by March 1. Based on the test result and the time passed since the patient showed any symptoms, “the person is no longer contagious,” according to the release.

Of the two types of tests conducted in Cooke County, only one indicates whether someone is currently infected, the release explained.

The type of test used in state and federal counts is considered the most accurate test and is the type provided at the Cooke County testing site at North Texas Medical Center. That test uses a swab to collect a sample from the person’s nasal or throat area to seek actively infected, symptomatic specimens and is sent to a lab for testing. Results are taking about 3 days to return now, according to the release.

As of noon Thursday, 150 of those tests had been conducted, with 118 returning negative results and 32 pending, according to the release.

The other kind of test that can show someone was previously infected is an IgG or IgM test, done rapidly in a medical provider’s office with a few drops of blood. Results show up within minutes. A positive result means one of two things — either someone is either actively infected, or was in the past but is no longer, according to the release. The provider uses such results along with their own observations to determine an individual patient’s course of action.

ORIGINAL 5:19 p.m.:

A Cooke County resident is believed to have had COVID-19 over a month ago but hasn’t shown symptoms since the first part of March, the Cooke County Joint Information Task Force announced late Thursday, April 9.

The resident was tested using a type of test that can flag previous infections even if the patient isn’t currently infected or contagious, according to a JIC press release. It’s one of two types of tests used in Cooke County, but because it can return a positive result when someone isn’t “actively infected,” according to the release, results from that type of test aren’t counted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The patient was tested this week, JIC spokeswoman Kristi Rigsby said.

This report will be updated.

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