AUSTIN—All eight of the Texas Constitutional amendments on the Nov. 2 ballot received majority votes in favor of the changes, according to unofficial election results.

Voters across the state were asked to cast ballots on several issues including Proposition 6 which solidifies caregiver visits in nursing homes and other like facilities as a constitutional right.

The amendment goes a step further than Senate Bill 25, which prevents the long-term suspension of visitations by family. It was signed into law in June and went into effect on Sept. 1.

During the coronavirus pandemic, nursing homes were forced to deny family visitations for months in an effort to limit the virus from entering facilities. However, Texas Health Care Association President and CEO Kevin Warren said this decision greatly impacted the mental health and overall wellbeing of residents as they were isolated from family as well as each other.

While Warren said he recognizes the decision to pause visitations during the pandemic was based on information available at the time, in hindsight he does not believe it should happen again.

“We recognize the value and the importance of family and the role that they play, not only with the residents but [also] the staff,” Warren said. “We've got to ensure that this doesn’t go on for these long periods of time and that this can't happen again.”

Proposition 6, as well as Proposition 3—which looks to prohibit the state or any political subdivision from limiting religious services or organizations—stemmed from the coronavirus pandemic.

As of 11 p.m. and with 62% of polling locations reporting, here are the preliminary results of statewide propositions. Results are unofficial until canvassed.

Proposition 1: passed with 83.8% of the vote in favor; 16.2% of the vote opposed.

The proposition authorizes professional sports team charitable organizations to conduct raffles at rodeo venues.

Proposition 2: passed with 63.14% of the vote in favor; 36.86% of the vote opposed.

This proposition authorizes a county to issue bonds to fund infrastructure and transportation projects in undeveloped and blighted areas.

Proposition 3: passed with 63.08% of the vote in favor; 36.92% of the vote opposed.

This proposition amends the Texas Constitution to prohibit the state or any political subdivision from enacting a law, rule, order, or proclamation that limits religious services or organizations.

Proposition 4: passed with 58.83% of the vote in favor; 41.17% of the vote opposed.

This proposition changes the eligibility requirements for the following judicial offices: a justice of the supreme court, a judge of the court of criminal appeals, a justice of a court of appeals, and a district judge

Proposition 5: passed with 59.26% of the vote in favor; 40.74% of the vote opposed.

This proposition authorizes the Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct to accept and investigate complaints and reports against candidates running for state judicial office.

Proposition 6: passed with 87.93% of the vote in favor; 12.07% of the vote opposed.

This proposition amends the Texas Constitution to state that residents of nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, or state-supported living centers have a right to designate an essential caregiver that may not be prohibited from visiting the resident.

Proposition 7: passed with 86.86% of the vote in favor; 13.14% of the vote opposed.

This proposition amends the Texas Constitution to allow the legislature to extend a homestead tax limit for surviving spouses of disabled individuals as long as the spouse is 55 years old and resides at the home.

Proposition 8: passed with 87.44% of the vote in favor; 12.56% of the vote opposed.

This proposition amends the Texas Constitution to allow the legislature to apply a homestead tax exemption for surviving spouses of members of the military to those fatally injured in the line of duty. The amendment would take effect on Jan. 1.

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